Remarks honoring League member Madlyn Calbert

 Madelyn Calbert (center) at the 90th Anniversary March in front of the White House with Melody Webb, then President Billy Day, and Natalie Howard.

Madelyn Calbert (center) at the 90th Anniversary March in front of the White House with Melody Webb, then President Billy Day, and Natalie Howard.

We are sad to announce the passing of long time League member Madlyn Calbert.


Past President Billie Day presented the following remarks at her Memorial Service for us on    May 31, 2018

I am honored to be here today as a past president of the DC League of Women Voters to honor one of our dedicated active members, Madlyn  Calbert.  

The purpose of our grassroots organization is  that informed active voters should play a critical role in democracy and that all citizens should have a right to equal and easy access to that vote.  

The League of Women Voters had its birth on February 14, 1920.  One month later, Madlyn Williams was born.  Her life paralleled that of the League and the advance of democracy in our country.  And Madlyn was ever a part of that civil society procession and struggle.

I met Madlyn in 1975 when her sister Lucille Bridges convened an organizing meeting to inaugurate a state council of the social studies in DC. Although an English teacher, Madlyn was interested in civic education and involvement.  I'm told it was another sister, Edna McClellan, and Madlyn's good friend Constance Tate, both active in the League who recruited Madlyn to join it.  In speaking with other members, Madlyn is remembered as intelligent, talented, modest, an able organizer and administrator as well as a terrific hostess.  

Madlyn headed various League committees, served on the board of directors on several occasions, and served as Vice President.  She also served as co-chair of the Upper 16th Street Unit.  I remember Sheila Keeny, another past president, telling me of working with Madlyn and others who were determined League membership and leadership be representative of all the community.

In 2010, the 90th anniversary of the League (and of Madlyn!), she participated in a day long demonstration at the White House for Congressional representation and budget autonomy for the District of Columbia.  That same year, she and her husband were nominated by the League and received a human rights award for community service  from the United Nations Association.

While maintaining her commitment to family, church, and profession, Madlyn brought her talent, leadership and warmth in so many ways to all her voluntary organizations and activities to leave us a better world.

The League of Women Voters is so grateful for her leadership and service with us.